‘The Flash’ S1E19 recap: ‘Who is Harrison Wells’

The Flash, Season 1

      Last week, Barry and company brought Caitlin in on their investigation of Wells, and, no surprise, she was highly skeptical of their accusations, which amounted to little more than conjecture. So, this week’s episode, which is mainly concerned with table setting, finds Cisco and Joe traveling to Starling City to find proof of Wells’ villainy. Meanwhile Barry, Eddie, and Caitlin hold down the fort in Central City as they handle a metahuman with the ability to shape-shift—which, annoyingly, leads to a lot of plot-mandated stupidity and “acting” as some of the actors are called onto play someone playing them.

METAHUMAN OF THE WEEK: Hannibal Bates, a.k.a Everyman

  • Barry and Eddie first become aware of this week’s metahuman when an employee at a bank is caught on camera stealing from the safety deposit boxes.
  • She claims to be innocent and even has an alibi, but they have video evidence, so she must be lying.

      The possibility of a metahuman that shape-shifts just by touching someone worries Wells and Cailtin because not only could he uncover and reveal Barry’s poorly kept secret identity, but touching Barry may also give him Barry’s powers. They’re able to identify the shape-shifter, Hannibal Bates, by looking going through recent police cases where the perp plead innocent in spite of damning video evidence.

      The police cruiser camera captured the whole thing, so Eddie is in trouble because “It wasn’t me. It was a metahuman with the ability to shape-shift” isn’t a good explanation for the footage—at least not yet. Clearly equating this situation with his own father’s false accusation and imprisonment,

It took 19 episodes, but we finally saw Barry and Eddie have a bonding moment that was almost entirely independent of the cursed love triangle.

      You remember how I said there was a lot of plot mandated stupidity? Well, here’s where it all happens. Barry’s at home on the phone with a worried Iris, when Eddie (read: Bates) shows up at his door claiming that Singh pulled some strings to let him go. Let’s be real, Barry is an intelligent guy and the fact that he didn’t find Eddie’s appearance even slightly suspicious is unbelievable. Bates knocks Barry out, assumes his identity just in time for Caitlin to show up and tell him she’s made a serum to temporarily take away Bates’ powers.

Caitlin and Bates (as Barry) head back to S.T.A.R. Labs and Bates notices how hot Caitlin is and kisses her. It’s a moment that launched thousands of at first happy then sad #Snowbarry shipper faces as they realized the kiss doesn’t really count.

  • At first Caitlin seems weirded out, but she eventually goes with it until they are interrupted by the computer alerting them that Iris is on her way up. Iris watched the video of Eddie and realized it wasn’t him because he used his left hand to shoot the cops; the real Eddie is right-handed. Right at that moment, Wells rolls in and tasers Bates, who was reaching for a gun with his left hand. (Fun fact: Wells is left-handed).

  • Wells and Cailtin try to convince Iris to let them handle Bates, but she insists on taking him to the police.
  • Caitlin offers to help her, which leads to Caitlin and Iris transporting a criminal because that makes sense and nothing can go wrong. Oh wait, it does.
    • Handcuffed in the backseat of Iris’ car that’s stopped at a red light, Bates transforms into a little girl and attracts the attention of a construction team by yelling that Iris and Cailtin kidnapped her. Thus, Bates escapes to the airport.
  • Serum in hand, The Flash speeds off to the airport to catch Bates.

  • This all leads to the requisite Flash vs. Metahuman fight, which is made slightly more thrilling by the fact that Bates transforms into Caitlin, Iris, Eddie, and of course, The

  • Thankfully, a security camera recorded the entire fight and Eddie’s name is cleared, while Bates is placed in the pipeline.

Sourced from


‘The Flash’ Recap: Barry Faces His Greatest Foe Yet, a Contrived Plot - Spinoff Online

flash-harrison2

Barry Allen is the most sincere, likable and joyful superhero in the ever-expanding landscape of comic book television. >This week, however, he also became the stupidest, as for the first time “The Flash” stumbled in its portrayal of its title character.

Let’s begin with the freak of the week, the Everyman (aka Hannibal Bates), introduced in 2006 in DC Comics’ “52” #21. On TV, Bates’ name first appeared on Oliver Queen’s hit list (nice continuity), but Everyman debuts this week as a villain who can take the form of anyone he touches.

It has all the makings of a classic hero-versus-villain showdown, but the episode fails in execution because more than one of our protagonists ends up looking like a drooling idiot.

      Everyman is introduced in a harmless story fashion, with the villain taking the form of a woman to clear out some safe-deposit boxes. Police arrest the woman, who swears she’s innocent, despite the recorded evidence. This brings to light a number of potential suspects in Central City prisons who have solid alibis yet are shown on tape committing crimes. Everyman tries to sell the stolen jewels, which alerts Eddie Thawne. The detective tracks the villain, only to be framed by Everyman in the shooting two cops.

flash-harrison8

Eddie is jailed, which Barry takes personally because of his own father’s wrongful imprisonment, laying the groundwork for what should be a rollicking episode with high stakes.

  • Except that, after Eddie begs his friend to clear his name, Barry is visited at home by Everyman in Eddie’s form. And Barry falls for the ruse, even after he just saw Eddie.

There’s absolutely no reason to make Barry look that stupid. Everyman could assume any number of forms to fool Barry, but Eddie shouldn’t be one of them, not after he begged his friend to allow him to stay in prison.

It’s the worst type of plot convenience, and it really hurts what could have been a very cool episode. It’s bad enough that Barry constantly needs help from Team Flash to solve every villain problem, but here he comes as a doddering idiot for the sake of the plot. This show rules 98 percent of the time; the writers can do better than that (however, they do get points for having a psychotic villain named Bates disguise himself as his mother).

flash-harrison5

Happily, the rest of the episode almost makes up for the haphazard plotting of the main storyline. Joe West and Cisco Ramon travel to Starling City to investigate the death of Harrison Wells’ beloved fiancé Tessa.

  • West solicits the help of Quentin Lance to obtain information on the fateful accident that we know was caused by Eobard Thawne. Along the way, the two enjoy some wonderful father-to-father bonding as West encourags Lance to forgive Laurel. Anyone watching “Arrow” knows what a painful drama that has been, and hopefully West’s words will impact the increasingly unstable Lance.

  • Meanwhile, Cisco and Laurel enjoy a little time together as he upgrades Sara Lance’s old sonic grenade. Enhancing the device, Cisco attaches it to a choker, giving Laurel her Canary Cry. In return, Cisco receives a photo of himself posing with a costumed Black Canary, a brilliant moment that almost makes up for the episode’s lack of cohesion.

Source


layout: post title: “Flash 19 Research” date: 2015-04-23 13:09:09

tags: flash notes gatherings

'The Flash' recap: 'Who is Harrison Wells'

The Flash, Season 1       Last week, Barry and company brought Caitlin in on their investigation of Wells, and, no surprise, she was highly skeptical of their accusations, which amounted to little more than conjecture. So, this week's episode, which is mainly concerned with table setting, finds Cisco and Joe traveling to Starling City to find proof of Wells' villainy. Meanwhile Barry, Eddie, and Caitlin hold down the fort in Central City as they handle a metahuman with the ability to shape-shift—which, annoyingly, leads to a lot of plot-mandated stupidity and “acting” as some of the actors are called onto play someone playing them.

METAHUMAN OF THE WEEK: Hannibal Bates, a.k.a Everyman

  • Barry and Eddie first become aware of this week's metahuman when an employee at a bank is caught on camera stealing from the safety deposit boxes.
  • She claims to be innocent and even has an alibi, but they have video evidence, so she must be lying.

      The possibility of a metahuman that shape-shifts just by touching someone worries Wells and Cailtin because not only could he uncover and reveal Barry's poorly kept secret identity, but touching Barry may also give him Barry's powers. They're able to identify the shape-shifter, Hannibal Bates, by looking going through recent police cases where the perp plead innocent in spite of damning video evidence.

      The police cruiser camera captured the whole thing, so Eddie is in trouble because “It wasn't me. It was a metahuman with the ability to shape-shift” isn't a good explanation for the footage—at least not yet. Clearly equating this situation with his own father's false accusation and imprisonment,

It took 19 episodes, but we finally saw Barry and Eddie have a bonding moment that was almost entirely independent of the cursed love triangle.

      You remember how I said there was a lot of plot mandated stupidity? Well, here's where it all happens. Barry's at home on the phone with a worried Iris, when Eddie (read: Bates) shows up at his door claiming that Singh pulled some strings to let him go. Let's be real, Barry is an intelligent guy and the fact that he didn't find Eddie's appearance even slightly suspicious is unbelievable. Bates knocks Barry out, assumes his identity just in time for Caitlin to show up and tell him she's made a serum to temporarily take away Bates' powers.

Caitlin and Bates (as Barry) head back to S.T.A.R. Labs and Bates notices how hot Caitlin is and kisses her. It's a moment that launched thousands of at first happy then sad #Snowbarry shipper faces as they realized the kiss doesn't really count.

  • At first Caitlin seems weirded out, but she eventually goes with it until they are interrupted by the computer alerting them that Iris is on her way up. Iris watched the video of Eddie and realized it wasn't him because he used his left hand to shoot the cops; the real Eddie is right-handed. Right at that moment, Wells rolls in and tasers Bates, who was reaching for a gun with his left hand. (Fun fact: Wells is left-handed).

  • Wells and Cailtin try to convince Iris to let them handle Bates, but she insists on taking him to the police.

  • Caitlin offers to help her, which leads to Caitlin and Iris transporting a criminal because that makes sense and nothing can go wrong. Oh wait, it does.

    • Handcuffed in the backseat of Iris' car that's stopped at a red light, Bates transforms into a little girl and attracts the attention of a construction team by yelling that Iris and Cailtin kidnapped her. Thus, Bates escapes to the airport.
  • Serum in hand, The Flash speeds off to the airport to catch Bates.

  • This all leads to the requisite Flash vs. Metahuman fight, which is made slightly more thrilling by the fact that Bates transforms into Caitlin, Iris, Eddie, and of course, The

  • Thankfully, a security camera recorded the entire fight and Eddie's name is cleared, while Bates is placed in the pipeline.

Sourced from


'The Flash' Recap: Barry Faces His Greatest Foe Yet, a Contrived Plot - Spinoff Online

flash-harrison2

Barry Allen is the most sincere, likable and joyful superhero in the ever-expanding landscape of comic book television.

This week, however, he also became the stupidest, as for the first time “The Flash” stumbled in its portrayal of its title character.

Let's begin with the freak of the week, the Everyman (aka Hannibal Bates), introduced in 2006 in DC Comics' “52” #21. On TV, Bates' name first appeared on Oliver Queen's hit list (nice continuity), but Everyman debuts this week as a villain who can take the form of anyone he touches.

It has all the makings of a classic hero-versus-villain showdown, but the episode fails in execution because more than one of our protagonists ends up looking like a drooling idiot.

      Everyman is introduced in a harmless story fashion, with the villain taking the form of a woman to clear out some safe-deposit boxes. Police arrest the woman, who swears she's innocent, despite the recorded evidence. This brings to light a number of potential suspects in Central City prisons who have solid alibis yet are shown on tape committing crimes. Everyman tries to sell the stolen jewels, which alerts Eddie Thawne. The detective tracks the villain, only to be framed by Everyman in the shooting two cops.

flash-harrison8

Eddie is jailed, which Barry takes personally because of his own father's wrongful imprisonment, laying the groundwork for what should be a rollicking episode with high stakes.

  • Except that, after Eddie begs his friend to clear his name, Barry is visited at home by Everyman in Eddie's form. And Barry falls for the ruse, even after he just saw Eddie.

There's absolutely no reason to make Barry look that stupid. Everyman could assume any number of forms to fool Barry, but Eddie shouldn't be one of them, not after he begged his friend to allow him to stay in prison.

It's the worst type of plot convenience, and it really hurts what could have been a very cool episode. It's bad enough that Barry constantly needs help from Team Flash to solve every villain problem, but here he comes as a doddering idiot for the sake of the plot. This show rules 98 percent of the time; the writers can do better than that (however, they do get points for having a psychotic villain named Bates disguise himself as his mother).

flash-harrison5

Happily, the rest of the episode almost makes up for the haphazard plotting of the main storyline. Joe West and Cisco Ramon travel to Starling City to investigate the death of Harrison Wells' beloved fiancé Tessa.

  • West solicits the help of Quentin Lance to obtain information on the fateful accident that we know was caused by Eobard Thawne. Along the way, the two enjoy some wonderful father-to-father bonding as West encourags Lance to forgive Laurel. Anyone watching “Arrow” knows what a painful drama that has been, and hopefully West's words will impact the increasingly unstable Lance.

  • Meanwhile, Cisco and Laurel enjoy a little time together as he upgrades Sara Lance's old sonic grenade. Enhancing the device, Cisco attaches it to a choker, giving Laurel her Canary Cry. In return, Cisco receives a photo of himself posing with a costumed Black Canary, a brilliant moment that almost makes up for the episode's lack of cohesion.

Source